What you need to know: FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

What is your fee?

I charge $120 for a fifty-minute hour, and $175 for an 80-minute session. If you are seeking clinical supervision, my fee depends on the number of client hours you have each week on average.

Do you accept insurance?

Currently, I am not on any panels, other than a couple of slots for Colorado Access, which are usually full. I do, however, provide a “superbill,” which has all the information you need in order to be reimbursed by your insurance company for using an out-of-network provider. I would advise that you check with your insurance to see what deductible and copay you would be responsible for.

Do you accept sliding scale?

For a percentage of my clients, I do. However, that percentage is usually satisfied fairly quickly. The sad truth about this industry is that it is a business, like any other, and a labor-intensive one at that. In order to stay in business, all therapists must make a certain minimum to stay in business and and remain current in their knowledge of what does, and doesn’t, help the client. However, there are agencies in town, primarily fueled by interns still at the beginning of their journey, some of which receive grants and government funding and can therefore underwrite some of the costs.

I like your website, and think you might be a good choice for me: what’s my first step?

First, I meet with all potential clients and supervisees. This meeting lasts for thirty minutes, at no cost to you. Scheduling is easy, simply go to my contact page and schedule an initial interview. When we meet, you’ll have an opportunity to ask me what you need to know in order to make a well-informed decision, to get a sense of who I am and what I might offer you, and see how comfortable you are in my office. Then, you will leave and take as much time as you need to make the right decision for you.

What are some pointers to keep in mind, so that I can get the most bang for my buck?

  1. Show up, on time, ready for the work
  2. I’ll give you something to think about, some activity or exercise to perform, so that you can bring our work into the life you want to improve. Do it.
  3. If my approach isn’t working for you, let me know. Through my twenty years in practice, I’ve become skilled in multiple areas, so I can certainly adjust my approach to better serve your needs.
  4. Don’t cheat yourself on the time you give to your healing. Therapy is expensive. There, I said it. And it’s tempting to come less often, even though with some reprioritizing you can make it weekly for at least the first four weeks. However, much of my work, particularly the somatic approaches, benefit from keeping the momentum going, much like exercising at the gym. Plan to come regularly, on a weekly basis, if you want to get the full benefit of your treatment. It may help to think of me as a Personal Trainer, only better dressed (I think).  Again, do the exercises between sessions.
  5. Recognize that the work we’ll be doing is somatic, not primarily talk. It digs deep, and actually impacts your body physically. If you don’t believe that you’re open to somatic work, or that it might be too much for you, be honest. I may not be the right person for you. You decide whether it’s worth a try.

If I am unhappy with you, what are my options?

I’d first encourage you to talk to me about it. However, and this is true of all licensed clinicians, you have the right to contact the Department of Regulatory Agencies and lodge a complaint. Once you’ve terminated work with me, you have seven years to do so.